ArcGIS Blog » Mapping http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis ArcGIS Blog Sat, 25 Oct 2014 00:47:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.4.2 Enhanced Shuttle Land Elevation Data (SRTM 30 meters) now in Esri World Elevation Services http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/10/17/enhanced-shuttle-land-elevation-data-srtm-30-meters-now-in-esri-world-elevation-services/ http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/10/17/enhanced-shuttle-land-elevation-data-srtm-30-meters-now-in-esri-world-elevation-services/#comments Fri, 17 Oct 2014 20:37:18 +0000 rajnagi http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/?p=42865 Continue reading ]]> by Rajinder Nagi, Lead Community Elevation

Africa

On September 23, 2014, the White House announced that the highest possible resolution elevation data generated from NASA’s Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) in 2000 will be released globally over the next year. The announcement was made at the United Nations Heads of State Climate Summit in New York.

Previously, SRTM data for regions outside the United States were sampled at 3 arc-seconds (approx. 90 meters) for public release. The new data being released at 1 arc-second (approx. 30 meters) pixel size, now reveals the full resolution of the original measurements. With the announcement, data for most of Africa and its surrounding areas was released jointly by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Immediately following the President’s speech, Esri announced that it will enhance its existing World Elevation Map to include this more detailed 1 arc-second (~ 30 meters) SRTM data, making the data available to its customers and others around the world.  ”This will add to the rich data offerings already available to Esri customers through ArcGIS Online, and will help our users build more resilient communities and address pressing environmental and societal issues.” said Jack Dangermond, Esri founder and president.

Esri’s comprehensive World Elevation layers provide online access to a global collection of multi-resolution and multisource elevation data from best publically available sources and includes derivative layers for visualization (such as multi-directional hillshade, tinted hillshade) and analysis (such as slope, aspect).

We are excited to release SRTM 1 arc-second (~30 meters) of Africa continent as part of Esri’s World Elevation Services.Craters Highland,Tanzania

Figure 1: A portion near Craters Highland, Tanzania depicted with newly released SRTM 30 m (right) showing improvements over SRTM 90 m (left)

Ukahlamba, Darkensberg Mountains

Figure 2: A portion of Ukahlamba, Darkensberg (a World Heritage Site), Southern Africa depicted with newly released SRTM 30 m (right) showing improvements over SRTM 90 m (left)

This dataset greatly enhances the world elevation layers and its derivatives. We will continue to improve these layers with best authoritative data available from public sources and community contributors. For more information on becoming a Community Maps for Elevation contributor, click here.

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User Community Map Layers Improve the World Topographic Map and Add Content to the Living Atlas http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/10/16/release16oct15/ http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/10/16/release16oct15/#comments Thu, 16 Oct 2014 21:41:36 +0000 Shane Matthews http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/?p=42782 Continue reading ]]> The ArcGIS Content Team has updated the World Topographic Map for the second time this month! Another big thanks to the user community who are helping improve the Community Basemaps by submitting new and updated content to the ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World. This week’s refresh includes new contributions and updates for several cities and counties throughout the United States and Canada.

When we socializeCommunity Basemaps have ‘improved’ by incorporating new contributions and updates“, what does that really mean? This release has some very compelling detail that I believe should be exposed. The images below speak for themselves. Improved detail in the online basemaps supports more useful web maps and apps, a better user experience, and access to contemporary content.

Our first new contributor is the Greater Bridgeport Regional Council (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k). This regional planning agency guides decision making that promotes growth and development in the region.

Bridgeport, CT 1:9k

Greater Bridgeport Regional Council 1:9K

This region is now able to incorporate this new content into a 3D Base Layer. This Base layer provides a 3D foundation for a region or city, gives context to projects, acts as a canvass for projects and analysis, and can be shared in apps to the global community.

Greater Bridgeport Regional Council, CT 3D City Base 

Our next new contribution is Indiana State Fairgrounds, IN (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k), built by Tom Brenneman in Esri’s St. Louis Regional Office.

Indiana State Fairgrounds 1:9K (Before)

Indiana State Fairgrounds 1:9K (After)

It will be interesting to see how this new web app is used with the introduction of this great new detail.

The Wheaton Park District, IL (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k) is our next new contributor. This park district supports their community by providing diverse leisure pursuits and appreciation of the natural world through a variety of programs held at various parks and facilities.

Northside Park 1:4K (Before)

Northside Park 1:2K (After)

This useful web map illustrates addresses within the Wheaton Park District using DuPage County Jan 2014 parcel data.

Out final new contributor in this release takes us to the west coast of the United States to Woodburn, OR (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Woodburn, OR 1:9K (Before)

Woodburn, OR 1:9K (After)

The new content for Woodburn will help better support this Oregon Zoning web map.

Included in this release are 6 updates from existing Community Maps contributors.

Kitsap County and Seattle, WA 1:9K (Before)

Kitsap County and Seattle, WA 1:9K (After)

Leon County, FL (county seat Tallahassee) 1:9K (Before)

Leon County, FL (county seat Tallahassee) 1:9K (After)

Mesa, AZ 1:9K

District of Sooke/City of Victoria, BC, Canada 1:9K (Before)

District of Sooke/City of Victoria, BC, Canada 1:9K (After)

Utah AGRC 1:9K

Our final update for this release is Washington, D.C. (Topo 1:18k to 1:1k).

Washington, D.C. 1:9K (Before)

Washington, D.C. 1:9K (After)

Need help preparing your content for Community Maps? We can help your organization, university, or campus by way of our new and improved Community Maps data prep tools. We offer a domestic and international tool set to help you get your content in the basemaps quickly. These tools will assist you with map layers included in the World Topographic Map, including road centerlines. The video below explains how to use the Road Centerline Data Prep Tool to prepare your road data for contribution to Community Maps and the ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World.

Showcase your organization! If you work for an organization that is benefiting from Community Maps Participation and would like to share your work with our expanding user community, please contact Shane Matthews (smatthews@esri.com) or Community Maps (communitymaps@esri.com) and tell us your story and have a chance to be featured in a Community Maps Webinar segment.

Here’s a list of all the community contributors for this release:

These contributions were made through the Community Maps Program. For more information visit the Community Maps Program Resource Center.

The service was updated on the following servers: services.arcgisonline.com and server.arcgisonline.com. If you have previously used the World_Topo_Map, you may need to clear your cache in order to see the updates.

If you have feedback on content, try our Topographic Map Feedback web map.

If you have other feedback or comments, please post them to the ArcGIS Discussion Group on GeoNet.

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Data Visualization with ArcGIS API for JavaScript: Show Data by Color http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/10/10/data-visualization-with-arcgis-api-for-javascript-show-data-by-color/ http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/10/10/data-visualization-with-arcgis-api-for-javascript-show-data-by-color/#comments Fri, 10 Oct 2014 16:49:58 +0000 Jerome Yang http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/?p=42715 Continue reading ]]>

Mapping data values by varying the color has been the most popular way to visualize geospatial data. Academically it is called choropleth by cartographers. If you do an image search for “US population map” online, 90% of the results would be choropleth maps. In this post, we will look at this well-known mapping technique, and learn how you can create a map with our contemporary, easy-to-use API.

Get started (sample)

Mapping data by color (choropleth) has never been easier. With our API, it only takes a few lines of code. More importantly, our API helps ensure the map is meaningful. You will see this as we introduce advanced options later. Now let’s first look at the simplest starter app.

To begin with, you need a web map application with a layer displayed. If you don’t know how to do so yet, review the first post of this series.

On the renderer, you can use the .setColorInfo method to set the colorInfo property. Simply provide a field name, min and max values, and an array of colors:

renderer.setColorInfo({
  field: "Percent_Uninsured",
  maxDataValue: 42,
  minDataValue: 6,
  colors: [
    new Color("#fffcd4"), new Color("#e0b2c1"), new Color("#c168ad"),
    new Color("#7b3578"), new Color("#350242")
  ]
});

A smooth color ramp will be created with the five colors specified above. This ramp is stretched from the lowest value (6) to the largest value (42) that goes from light (for low values) to dark (for high values). This is called a sequential color ramp and is the most common way to make choropleth maps, although as you will see below, there are some good alternatives to this design.

Advanced option #1: focus the color ramp (sample)

In the previous sample, the specified minDataValue and maxDataValue happen to be the minimum and maximum in the data – but, they could actually be any other values. In fact, the actual minimum and maximum are often outliers. As you can see, most values in the sample are actually below 24 and in fairly similar colors. Only a few counties got apparent purple. We were highlighting a few high-value counties rather than showing the overall pattern of the country.

Therefore, we highly recommend setting the minDataValue and the maxDataValue to form a narrower range, within which most data values are located.

In order to do so, you must have good understanding about your data. In this sample, we know the average uninsured percentage of the 3,143 counties in the US is 15, and the standard deviation is 5. Therefore, we set minDataValue and maxDataValue to 5 and 25 respectively, to focus the color ramp on data within 2 standard deviations.

renderer.setColorInfo({
  field: "Percent_Uninsured",
  maxDataValue: 25,
  minDataValue: 5,
  colors: [
    new Color("#fffcd4"), new Color("#e0b2c1"), new Color("#c168ad"),
    new Color("#7b3578"), new Color("#350242")
  ]
});

Compared to the previous sample, this app shows a lot more purple. Variation near the average is more visible because the outlier values are not defining the color ramp’s endpoints. The data you put on focus is a choice.

Advanced option #2: specify stops on color ramp (sample)

As mentioned above, the array of colors are placed equally to create a ramp, but we may want a specific color to be applied at a specific value. Instead of using colors in colorInfo, you can specify stops. Each stop in the array is an object containing a value and a color:

renderer.setColorInfo({
  field: "Percent_Uninsured",
  stops: [
    { value: 6, color: new Color("#570959") },
    { value: 15.4, color: new Color("#ffffff") },
    { value: 42, color: new Color("#a53217") }
  ]
});

This is useful when there are specific values you want to call out on the map. In the sample code above, we know the national average of uninsured individuals is 15.4%. We want to assign a neutral color to this value, and map other values divergently. Using the stops property in colorInfo allows us to attain this goal, and the legend shows this important value.

Alternative: classify your data (sample)

There is still another way you can create choropleth maps. If you want to tell a simple story, such as “what’s above a value”, “what’s below a value”, you may use ClassBreaksRenderer to classify your data to a few classes. In the code sample below, we will break the data into three classes: above national average, close to national average, and below national average. Use this renderer when it’s most important to show which group each feature is a part of.

You can create a class break renderer with the field you want to map, and then add breaks into the renderer. For each break, you can set its minimum value, maximum value, symbol and label:

var renderer = new ClassBreaksRenderer(null, "Percent_Uninsured");

var outline = new SimpleLineSymbol();
outline.setColor(new Color("#999999"));
outline.setWidth(0.5);

renderer.addBreak({
  label: "< 2.5% below national average",
  minValue: 6,
  maxValue: 12.9,
  symbol: new SimpleFillSymbol(SimpleFillSymbol.STYLE_SOLID, outline, new Color("#eecec9"))
});
renderer.addBreak( ... );
...

What’s coming next

Still we have more visualization methods available. Keep following this post series to learn how you can show data by varying the size, create dot density maps, and map predominant categories!

Also, be sure you check out this GitHub repo, where all the samples of this post post series are hosted.

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ArcGIS Online Basemaps and the Living Atlas have been updated with User Contributions http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/10/08/release15oct01/ http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/10/08/release15oct01/#comments Wed, 08 Oct 2014 19:30:38 +0000 Shane Matthews http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/?p=42398 Continue reading ]]> In our continued commitment to improve the ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World, the ArcGIS Content Team has enhanced the Community Basemaps by incorporating new and updated content. Thanks to the user community, the World Topographic Map has been updated with new contributions and updates in the United States, Europe and South America.

We’ll welcome our newest 9 contributors first. Beginning on the west coast of the United States is Bellingham, WA (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Bellingham, WA 1:9K

With each summer comes increased fire danger across the United States. Mitigation and awareness are key factors in wildfire prevention. Fire lookouts within our nation’s national forests can be useful in spotting and issuing warnings to area residents. This web app of Fire Lookouts was created by students at Western Washington University. The map includes important information including land management boundaries, slope profiles and lookout points with a 100 mile radius around Bellingham.

Shifting our focus to the inter-mountain west, there are three new contributors in Colorado. Eagle County, CO (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k), Loveland, CO (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k) and Pueblo, CO (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Eagle County, CO (Eagle, CO county seat) 1:9K

Eagle County has created some basic web maps showing zip code boundaries throughout the county.

Loveland, CO 1:9K

Loveland was one of many communities impacted by last year’s floods in many regions of Colorado. This web app, created by members of Esri’s Disaster Response Team, explores different areas in the state that were affected. The map detail below shows both population and total housing units that were impacted by flood damage. Now that Loveland’s content is incorporated into online basemaps, better planning and decisions will be made when a natural hazard strikes in the future.

Pueblo, CO 1:9K

Great web apps like this one that explores the historic sites listed in the National Historic Registry were created to take advantage of contributed content from Pueblo.

Heading south we find Luna County, NM (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k). Luna County lies just north of the Mexican border and contains three mountain ranges: Cooke’s Range in the north, the Florida Mountains on the southeastern side of Deming near the center of the county, and the Tres Hermanas Mountains in the southern part of the county near Columbus.

Luna County, NM (Deming, NM county seat) 1:9K

Our next new contributor is located in our nation’s heartland, Fulton County, OH (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Fulton County, OH (Wauseon, OH county seat) 1:9K

Fulton County is part of the Toledo, OH, Metropolitan Statistical Area and was named for Robert Fulton, inventor of the steamboat.

Heading down to the southeast we find our next two contributors, Shelby County, TN (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k), and University of North GA (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Shelby County, TN (Memphis, TN county seat) 1:9K

The Shelby County Tax Assessor Dept. created this web map that allows users to search for properties based on owner, address, and parcel ID. They are taking advantage of having their content leveraged across several online basemaps by offering the user a choice of basemaps to use when searching for property information.

In this example the Streets Basemap was used for this search.

University of North GA 1:2K

In 2012, the University System of Georgia approved the consolidation of North Georgia College and State University with Gainesville State College to form a new institution, the University of North Georgia in January 2013. We will be seeing some useful campus-level detailed maps soon.

Heading even farther south, we find our last new contributor, Altagracia, Venezuela (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Altagracia, Venezuela 1:9K

This contribution as well as a couple of updates that are detailed below were provided by Esri Venezuela.

In addition to the great new contributions, there are also 9 updates. Starting on the west coast of the United States, Anchorage, AK (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k), and Tacoma, WA (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Anchorage, AK 1:9K

Tacoma, WA 1:9K

In the Rocky Mountain region is Commerce City, CO (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Commerce City, CO 1:9K

There have been two updates in the Midwest, Sioux Falls, SD (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k) and  Appleton, WI (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Sioux Falls, SD 1:9K

Appleton, WI 1:9K

Carrboro, NC (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k) in the southeast has been updated.

There have been updates to cities in both Europe and South America. First is the Netherlands (Topo 1:72k to 1:1k).

Netherlands 1:72K

There are two updates in South America that include Maracaibo, Venezuela (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k), and San Francisco, Venezuela (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k). Content for these updates was provided by Esri Venezuela.

Maracaibo, Venezuela 1:9K

San Francisco, Venezuela 1:9K

Showcase your organization! If you work for an organization that is benefiting from Community Maps Participation and would like to share your work with our expanding user community, please contact Shane Matthews (smatthews@esri.com) or Community Maps (communitymaps@esri.com) and tell us your story and have a chance to be featured in a Community Maps Webinar segment.

Here’s a list of all the community contributors for this release:

These contributions were made through the Community Maps Program. For more information visit the Community Maps Program Resource Center.

The service was updated on the following servers: services.arcgisonline.com and server.arcgisonline.com. If you have previously used the World_Topo_Map, you may need to clear your cache in order to see the updates.

If you have feedback on content, try our Topographic Map Feedback web map.

If you have other feedback or comments, please post them to the ArcGIS Discussion Group on GeoNet.

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Generate contours dynamically with a new raster function! http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/09/25/contours_function/ http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/09/25/contours_function/#comments Thu, 25 Sep 2014 20:23:22 +0000 kevin_butler http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/?p=42245 Continue reading ]]> Users of elevation data or other continuous data such as temperature or air pressure, take note! A new custom raster function has been made available for you to add into ArcGIS (version 10.2.1 or later) Desktop and/or Server. This can be applied to generate raster contours on-the-fly from single rasters, mosaic datasets, or for client selection on image services.

Like other raster functions, the contour function is applied at the resolution and within the extents of the current view. A key capability of this implementation is the contour smoothing that can be used to remove jagged contours and artifacts that are common with highly accurate data. The function also includes an option to dynamically define the contour interval based on visible data range, providing coarse contours when zoomed out, and detailed contours when zoomed in. There is also a filled-color contours option, and the ability to export a smoothed raster if the user wants to generate vector contours with the same smoothing – the smoothed raster would be processed using the existing “contour” geoprocessing tool within ArcGIS Desktop (Spatial Analyst).  Screenshot examples are visible below.

This function is not currently built into ArcGIS; a download to install this function for ArcGIS Desktop and Server versions 10.2.1 and 10.2.2 is available here:  http://esriurl.com/ContourFunction.  Note that the contour function can be applied as a “Server Raster Function” to enable light client applications to activate and control the server-side rendering.  For Help regarding how to add an optional function onto an image service, see ArcGIS Help here.

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User Contributions have Improved ArcGIS Online Basemaps and the Living Atlas for the Second Time This Month http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/09/24/sep17release14/ http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/09/24/sep17release14/#comments Wed, 24 Sep 2014 16:25:10 +0000 Shane Matthews http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/?p=41931 Continue reading ]]> For the second time this month, The ArcGIS Content Team has improved the Community Basemaps by incorporating both new and updated content to the ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World. Thanks to the user community, the World Topographic Map was refreshed with 7 new contributors and 8 updates for cities, counties and universities throughout the United States.

Thanks to our growing user community, our basemaps are being updated more frequently and with better content, making these maps more accurate and more useful for everyone.

We’ll welcome our newest contributors first.

Londonderry, NH 1:9K

Londonderry, NH (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k) is wasting no time. They are busy incorporating their content into great web apps like this one that describes the area’s outdoor recreation.

Also in the northeast is Reading, MA (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Reading, MA 1:9K

Reading is also recognizing the benefits that comes with Community Maps participation by creating a number of useful web maps and apps like this wetlands map.

Sliding down to the southeast, we find Cabarrus County, NC (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Cabarrus County, NC 1:9K

Cabarrus County is cranking out all kinds of web maps and apps that include, zoning maps, polling places, congressional districts, and lots more. Here is a great example that incorporates many important community topics into one web map.

Coweta County, GA (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k) has also joined our community.

Coweta County, GA (Newnan, GA county seat) 1:9K

We are looking forward to seeing some useful maps and apps for this area soon.

Rounding out the new contributors in the southeast is Pinellas County, FL (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Pinellas County, FL (Clearwater, FL county seat) 1:9K

The Greenlight Pinellas Plan is illustrated through this web map, offering an interactive look at rail alternatives.

Heading west to Arizona is Glendale, AZ (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k), home of the 2015 NFL Super Bowl.

Glendale, AZ 1:9K

Glendale is crafting a variety of interesting web maps like this one illustrating child opportunity index. The Child Opportunity Index is calculated based on Education, Health & Built Environment and Neighborhood Social & Economic Opportunity indicators.

Our final new contributor is Santa Clara County, CA (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Santa Clara County, CA (San Jose, CA county seat) 1:9K

Santa Clara County has successfully created this web map describing soils data. This GIS Service maybe used in GIS software, and is optimized for Esri’s ArcMap software.  A great example of Web GIS!

In addition to the great new contributions, there are also 9 updates. Beginning in the northeast is Amherst and UMass Amherst, MA (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k) and Cambridge, MA and Harvard University (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Amherst and UMass Amherst, MA 1:9K

Cambridge, MA and Harvard University 1:9K

Swinging down to the mid-Atlantic, we have Baltimore, MD (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k) and Henrico County, VA (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Baltimore, MD 1:9K

Henrico County, VA (Richmond, VA county seat) 1:9K

Farther south to the Sunshine State is Bay County, FL (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Bay County, FL (Panama City, FL county seat) 1:9K

Heading west to the nation’s mid-section is Lee’s Summit, MO (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Lee’s Summit, MO 1:9K

Our next update is in the southwest, Clovis and Curry County, NM (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Clovis and Curry County, NM 1:9K

Finally, our last update can be found on the west coast in Woodland, CA (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Woodland, CA 1:9K

Showcase your organization! If you work for an organization that is benefiting from Community Maps Participation and would like to share your work with our expanding user community, please contact Shane Matthews (smatthews@esri.com) or Community Maps (communitymaps@esri.com) and tell us your story and have a chance to be featured in a Community Maps Webinar segment.

Please join the Esri Community Maps team on September 25th at 11:00 a.m. – noon, for another free webinar filled with exciting news about the Community Maps Program.

Tune in to stay current on what’s happening with Esri Community Maps. Join us on the 25th! Here’s how you can connect to the webinar, or just click here to add it to your calendar:

Topic: Community Maps Webinar

Date and Time: Thursday, September 25, 2014, 11:00 a.m. (PDT)

Join Webinar

Audio for the conference is available via your computer speakers and phone or teleconference. The following is connection information for the teleconference option:

Toll-free call-in number (US/Canada): 855-244-8681

Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 650-479-3207

Global call-in numbers

Toll-free dialing restrictions

Access code: 803 457 805

Topics will include…

  • Deane Kensok, manager of ArcGIS Content, will present an overview of the new Living Atlas of the World and describe the important role that Community Maps plays in building this unique resource.
  • Brett Horr of the Town of York, Maine, will share how participation in the Community Maps program benefits small municipalities.
  • Latest news from the Community Maps team and time for questions.

Here’s a list of all the community contributors for this release:

These contributions were made through the Community Maps Program. For more information visit the Community Maps Program Resource Center.

The service was updated on the following servers: services.arcgisonline.com and server.arcgisonline.com. If you have previously used the World_Topo_Map, you may need to clear your cache in order to see the updates.

If you have feedback on content, try our Topographic Map Feedback web map.

If you have other feedback or comments, please post them to the ArcGIS Discussion Group on GeoNet.

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Data Visualization with ArcGIS API for JavaScript: Enhancement Options http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/09/24/data-visualization-with-arcgis-api-for-javascript-enhancement-options/ http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/09/24/data-visualization-with-arcgis-api-for-javascript-enhancement-options/#comments Wed, 24 Sep 2014 14:45:56 +0000 Jerome Yang http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/?p=42130 Continue reading ]]> visualization-2-1

In the previous posts, we already learned how to display your data, and how to style your data by unique value with JavaScript API. You might feel content with simply displaying data on a map, but your audience may expect something beyond this. Where can they find the legend? What if they want more information about each feature on the map?

In this post, you will learn how to:

  • Use pop-up to provide additional information
  • Add legend
  • Trigger actions when a graphic is clicked


1. Use pop-up to provide additional information (Sample)

It’s very intuitive for any web map user to click on a graphic, expecting to get more information. With the feature layer in the JavaScript API, it’s very easy to accomplish this. Simply pass an InfoTemplate into the constructor as you create the feature layer, and you will get a popup with rich content.

var infoTemplate = new InfoTemplate("${Name}", "${Type}<br>${Visitor} visits in 2013");
var layer = new FeatureLayer("//services.arcgis.com/V6ZHFr6zdgNZuVG0/ArcGIS/rest/services/NationalParkStats2013/FeatureServer/0", {
  outFields: ["Name", "Type", "Visitor"],
  infoTemplate: infoTemplate
});

Some useful tips regarding the content of info template:

  • As you can see in the code above, you can use the text substitute syntax ${<field_name>} to get data into the popup.
  • Would like to insert thousands separators when displaying number? Use ${<field_name>:NumberFormat} to format your number.
  • To accomplish more complicated formatting, read Format info window content for more details.

You may alternatively pass a function as the second parameter into the info template (Sample):

visualization-2-2

var infoTemplate = new InfoTemplate("${Name}", function(graphic){
  //the graphic where user clicks
  var dailyVisit = graphic.attributes.Visitor/365;
  dailyVisit = Math.round(dailyVisit);
  return dailyVisit + " visits per day in 2013";
});

2. Add legend (Sample)

visualization-2-3

Legend is something traditional map readers would always expect. Esri’s Legend widget displays a label and symbol for some or all of the layers in the map. You can create a legend with your choice of layers to include with code like:

var legend = new Legend({
  map: map,
  layerInfos: [{
    layer: layer
  }]
}, "legend");
legend.startup();

Don’t like layer title displayed by default? Add the title property into the layerInfos array.

layerInfos: [{
  layer: layer,
  title: "National Park Statistics 2013"
}]

Since legend is a widget, you have to provide a DOM node to accommodate it. Be sure you create a DOM node in your HTML file and use the node’s ID to connect with the widget. You can look at this completed sample to see how you may configure the layout of your app.

3. Trigger actions when a graphic is clicked (Sample)

visualization-2-4

When your app user clicks on a graphic, instead of showing a pop-up to display more information, you may want to trigger other actions, such as changing symbols, executing queries or sending HTTP requests. Whatever you would like to allow your app user to do, the .on(“click”) event would give you such flexibility to accomplish some tasks only when a graphic is clicked.

layer.on("click", function(evt){
  console.log(evt.graphic);

});

Now let’s look at a common use case: select graphics within a distance from a location you click. Using the same national park service dataset, our goal is to let a user see what other parks are located within 200 miles from a specific park.

To accomplish this, we use feature layer’s .queryFeatures() method alone with the Query class.

layer.on("click", function(evt){
  //query the layer with 100-mile buffer
  var query = new Query();
  query.geometry = evt.graphic.geometry;
  query.distance = 200;
  query.units = "miles";

  //start query
  layer.queryFeatures(query).then(function(featureSet){
    //get all returned graphics
    var graphics = featureSet.features;
    ...
  });
});

Refer to this completed sample to see how you can highlight selected graphics and make the app work properly.

What’s coming next

There are still more options we offer for you to visualize your data. In the next two posts, we will look at how to vary color or size to visualize quantitative data. You can use these two techniques to create choropleth and proportional symbol map, respectively.

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CityEngine 2014.1 released! http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/09/15/41619/ http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/09/15/41619/#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:00:08 +0000 Gert van Maren http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/?p=41619 Continue reading ]]> As promised, here is another CityEngine release for this year. We are happy to announce CityEngine 2014.1, available for download from the customer care portal.

This version introduces some new exciting functionality, many enhancements and is even more stable than the previous release.

CityEngine 2014.1 new features and enhancements

Leaf shape exporting & reporting
Sounds technical but is very powerful. This version allows you to export so-called leaf shapes (shapes generated by a rule) as individual GIS features to the Geodatabase, including export of report values as attributes. When can this be useful? For example when you are interested in visual impact or solar exposure of a building. Sample the building in CityEngine, export the building panels and analyze in ArcGIS.


Visual impact analysis of proposed building in downtown Philadelphia

For more information, check out the 3DCity: Analysis workflow on the resource center.

List editor for related tables
We have improved the UI for viewing and editing related tables imported from the Geodatabase. If you import a feature class with a related table, you can edit the attributes of the related table now easily in a list editor.

General enhancements
This release includes many enhancements in CGA. We are introducing new functions & operations such as isClosedSurface and deleteHoles(). We also improved the Collada and multipatches (FGDB) importers support holes and fixed numerous issues making this release even more stable. A full overview of all enhancements can be found here.

For those of you that are new to CityEngine, you can download a 30 day, full functional trial version here.

The CityEngine team

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Data Visualization with ArcGIS API for JavaScript: Show Data by Unique Value http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/09/11/data-visualization-with-arcgis-api-for-javascript-show-data-by-unique-value/ http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/09/11/data-visualization-with-arcgis-api-for-javascript-show-data-by-unique-value/#comments Thu, 11 Sep 2014 17:10:26 +0000 Jerome Yang http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/?p=41827 Continue reading ]]> In the first post of this series, I mentioned a good way to determine which way to visualize your data is to ask questions about the purpose of the map. In addition to “where things are,” which we already examined in that post, you may also want answer questions like:

  • What chain does each restaurant belong to in my city?
  • What is the most predominant crop of each county in the US?
  • What level of crime risk does each census tract have?

Unique value renderer is good for answering your what questions.

The unique value renderer looks at an attribute field in your layer, and provides a symbol for each unique value in that field. In this sample, we will again use the National Park Service Units dataset. The resulting map shows each unit with its own type, such as “national park”, “national monument”, etc.

Create a unique value renderer

The way to create a unique value renderer is very similar to the way you create a simple renderer, which we have introduced in the first post. The key difference is you need to pass an extra argument into the UniqueValueRenderer constructor: a field name. This field’s values will determine which symbol is used for each feature on the map. In this sample, we choose the field "Type"

var symbol = new SimpleMarkerSymbol();
symbol.setColor(new Color("#cccccc"));
var renderer = new UniqueValueRenderer(symbol, "Type");

The symbol object above is the default symbol for your data.

Define symbols for the unique values

The whole purpose of a map that answers what questions is to clearly show features on the map, logically grouped by something they have in common, as designated by their unique value in a field. To accomplish this, create symbols which relate to the subject, but are different enough from one another that patterns can emerge on the map. Defining symbols is an iterative process: try something, then modify based on feedback.

To specify a unique symbol for each unique value in the Type field, you can use the addValue() method to pass a each value with its unique symbol:

var symbol1 = new SimpleMarkerSymbol();
symbol1.setColor(new Color("#ed5151"));
renderer.addValue("National Park", symbol1);

var symbol2 = new SimpleMarkerSymbol();
symbol2.setColor(new Color("#149ece"));
renderer.addValue("National Monument", symbol2);

It might not be necessary to provide unique symbols for all values in the field. In fact, your audience can hardly distinguish more than ten different colors. We recommend you only add symbols for the top few categories, and group all the others into a group called “others.” The rest will automatically get the default symbol, which is defined in the UniqueValueRenderer constructor.

Follow this link to see a completed sample.

As we put more than one color on the map, you may also want to add legend to your app. A similar sample with legend is available. We will take a closer look at legend in the next post.

One step further: convert raw data to pre-defined categories on the fly

View code

Sometimes you have a field with too many unique values, which make it hard to create a good visualization based on that field. One nice trick you can use with the unique value renderer is to convert raw data to a few pre-defined categories, on the fly. For example, instead of taking raw values in the "Address" field, if you would like to group data in a few categories like “Pacific West”, “Great Plains”, etc. based on the state name in the address, you can take advantage of this trick to convert data on client-side.

Converting raw values on the fly saves you the step of having to add a field to the data and calculate it, if that is something you don’t wish to do or cannot do.

This magic starts with the creation of the renderer:

var renderer = new UniqueValueRenderer(symbol, function(graphic){
  ...
});

For the second parameter in the renderer, instead of passing a field name (string), you provide a function to convert values in that field. This function gives you access to every graphic in the layer. Each graphic object contains all properties you need to show it on map, including geometry, attributes, etc.

Based a field "Address", we can convert the address into three categories: pacific west and other areas. We use graphic.attributes['Address'] to access this field. If an address contains state abbreviation CA, OR or WA, we categorize it as pacific west.

var renderer = new UniqueValueRenderer(null, function(graphic){
  if (graphic.attributes['Address'].indexOf("CA") !== -1 || graphic.attributes['Address'].indexOf("OR") !== -1 || graphic.attributes['Address'].indexOf("WA") !== -1) {
    return "Pacific West";
  } else {
    return "Other Areas";
  };
});

Following the creation of the renderer, we also need to provide symbols for these newly converted categories:

var symbol1 = new SimpleMarkerSymbol();
symbol1.setColor(new Color("#7b3578"));
renderer.addValue("Pacific West", symbol1);

var symbol2 = new SimpleMarkerSymbol();
symbol2.setColor(new Color("#cccccc"));
renderer.addValue("Other Areas", symbol2);

A finalized application can be found here. Using function in unique value renderer allows you to visualize not only the raw data in your feature layer, but also new information calculated from your raw values.

What’s coming next

This technique is actually very powerful. A few posts later, we will introduce predominance mapping, which utilizes this method to mine hidden stories from multiple columns of data. Before then, we will look at different ways to visualize numerical (quantitative) data, as well as how to add pop-up and legend to your apps.

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User Contributions have Improved the World Topographic Map http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/09/10/41481/ http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/2014/09/10/41481/#comments Wed, 10 Sep 2014 15:31:30 +0000 Shane Matthews http://blogs.esri.com/esri/arcgis/?p=41481 Continue reading ]]> The ArcGIS Content Team has improved the Community Basemaps by incorporating both new and updated content to the ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World. Thanks to the user community, the World Topographic Map was refreshed with 4 new contributors and 7 updates for cities and counties throughout the United States.

We’ll welcome our newest contributors first. Beginning in the mid-section of the United States is Ames, IA (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Ames has put together an impressive ArcGIS featured content and map gallery page for their city. The new basemap contribution from Ames will only make these web maps and apps even better.

Ames is made up of several distinct neighborhoods, including Campustown where one can find restaurants and nightlife venues that are unique to Ames.

The next newest contributor is also in Iowa, Johnson County (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k). Johnson is the fifth most populated county in the state of Iowa and home to, the county seat of Iowa City.

Iowa City residents will enjoy the updated basemap when using this web map of Iowa City Bike Trails.

We have a new contributor on the west coast, Kirkland, WA (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Kirkland’s vibrant downtown attracts locals and visitors to enjoy parks, shopping and eateries. If you hurry, you can still register for the TriFreaks Kirkland Triathlon. Local proceeds will support community organizations in this 11th annual event starting in Juanita Beach Park on September 21.

Our last new contributor for this update is Rockville, MD (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

The City of Rockville, MD has put together a rather nice map gallery that illustrates demographic data, bike paths, historic homes, and much more.

They are also using a variety of different community basemaps to describe these maps themes. Select map layers from the World Topographic Map are now being leveraged in other basemaps like Streets Map, the Light Gray Canvass Map and other reference maps. Rockville can now take advantage of a variety of basemaps to support their work.

In addition to the great new contributions, there are also 7 updates. In the state of Colorado there are 2 community updates Boulder, CO (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k) and Clear Creek County (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Boulder, CO  1:4K

Clear Creek County, CO (Georgetown, CO county seat) 1:2K

The Town of Dedham, MA (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k) has provided updates to their content.

Dedham, MA 1:4K

The remaining updates include 4 communities in the Midwest region of the country. Delaware County, OH (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k), Jasper County, MO (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k), Kane County, IL (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k), and Milwaukee County, WI (Topo 1:9k to 1:1k).

Delaware County, OH  (Delaware, OH county seat) 1:4K

Jasper County, MO (Carthage, MO county seat) 1:9K

Kane County, IL (Geneva, IL county seat) 1:9K

Milwaukee County (Milwaukee, WI county seat) 1:9K

All of these cities and counties have been keeping their content routinely updated through participating in Community Maps. Participation, however, does not end with simply contributing your organization’s content, but more importantly using the community basemaps to help get your work done. Our user community is accomplishing great things by contributing to the Living Atlas Basemaps.

We recently featured Fairfax County, VA during an interview at the User Conference in July. The testimony speaks for itself.

Jumping head first into the Community Basemap

If you work for an organization that is benefiting from Community Maps Participation and would like to share your work with our expanding user community, please contact Shane Matthews (smatthews@esri.com) or Community Maps (communitymaps@esri.com) and tell us your story and have a chance to be featured in a Community Maps Webinar segment.

Go map something.

Here’s a list of all the community contributors for this release:

These contributions were made through the Community Maps Program. For more information visit the Community Maps Program Resource Center.

The service was updated on the following servers: services.arcgisonline.com and server.arcgisonline.com. If you have previously used the World_Topo_Map, you may need to clear your cache in order to see the updates.

If you have feedback on content, try our Topographic Map Feedback web map.

If you have other feedback or comments, please post them to the ArcGIS Discussion Group on GeoNet.

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